The ILO MNE Declaration

The ILO Tripartite Declaration of Principles Concerning Multinational Enterprises and Social Policy (MNE Declaration) was negotiated and adopted by governments, employers and workers in 1977. It is the only ILO instrument that provides direct guidance on how companies can contribute to the realization of decent work for all and highlights the central role of freedom of association and collective bargaining as well as industrial relations and social dialogue. In March 2017, the MNE Declaration was substantially amended. The changes respond to increased international investment and trade and the growth of global supply chains. Moreover, the revision addresses issues related to social security, forced labour, transition from the informal to the formal economy, wages, due diligence processes, grievance mechanisms and access to remedy for victims of business-related human rights violations. Following the update of the Declaration, ACTRAV has decided to update its guidance document “The ILO MNE Declaration: What’s in it for Workers?”. The update strives to provide a forward-looking view on approaches and pledges how workers and trade unions can successfully use the MNE Declaration in practice, particularly in respect to its new elements. To this end, the revision adopted a participatory approach to get into an exchange how unions plan to make use of the new elements in the MNE Declaration. Input from different workers’ organizations enriched the revised Guide. ACTRAV’s guidance document to the MNE Declaration is designed to help workers and unions to advocate for the implementation and utilisation of the policies and principles contained within the MNE Declaration. I would like to thank in particular Felix Hadwiger who wrote this Guide, Esther Busser who coordinated the input of national and global trade unions, Githa Roelans and the MULTI team as well as Anna Biondi and the ACTRAV colleagues, in particular Tandiwe Gross, who provided substantial inputs and advice.

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